Physics

Program Overview

Program Overview

The Physics Program at Bard College is dedicated to helping students at all levels gain a better understanding of the universe and how it works.

As in all Bard programs, classes are small, with 20-30 students in the introductory classes, 10-15 in intermediate classes, and 1-5 in advanced classes and tutorials. This allows a high level of student-teacher interaction, as each faculty member handles all aspects of the course themselves: lectures, laboratories, discussion sections, and grading. That way, we are well attuned to the strengths and the needs of each of our students. Classes are never solely lectures, as student questions and comments lead to clarification or elaboration, or take the discussion in unexpected directions. Outside of class, faculty spend a great deal of time with individuals or small groups of students, discussing homework problems, laboratory work, or extensions beyond what was covered in class. more>

Announcements

Teaching Postdoctoral Fellow Position


The Physics Program at Bard College invites applications for a two-year postdoctoral teaching fellowship.

The department is in the midst of rapid growth and seeks to apply equal the same intellectual rigor to pedagogy and research and pedagogy. The candidate will teach one or two courses a year, as well as conduct doing research in quantum gravity and mathematical physics with Prof. Haggard. Eligibility is limited to applicants who have or will have completed their Ph.D in Physics, Astronomy or closely related field by the time of the appointment.

Bard College is a highly selective liberal arts college located in the beautiful Hudson valley area of upstate New York, a short train ride from New York City. The density of physics groups in the Mid-Hudson Valley this region also makes this an ideal location to connect with the broader physics community.

Interested candidates should send a cover letter, CV, a sample list of publications list, a statement of research interests/plans, and a teaching statement that summarizes her/his your teaching experience and philosophy for improving student engagement and learning. Our program serves only serves undergraduates and so you should also give some thought should be given to ways of as to how you would include undergraduates in your the candidate’s research program. The application and finally, arrange to have three recommendation letters should be sent directlThe Physics Program at Bard College invites applications for a two-year postdoctoral teaching fellowship.

The department is in the midst of rapid growth and seeks to apply equal intellectual rigor to pedagogy and research. The candidate will teach two courses a year, as well as conduct research in quantum gravity and mathematical physics with Prof. Haggard. Eligibility is limited to applicants who have or will have completed their Ph.D. in Physics, Astronomy or closely related field by the time of the appointment. The density of physics groups in the mid Hudson Valley makes this an ideal location to connect with the broader physics community.

Interested candidates should send a cover letter, CV, a list of publications, statement of research interests/plans, and a teaching statement that summarizes her/his teaching experience and philosophy for improving student engagement and learning. Our program serves undergraduates and thought should be given to ways of including undergraduates in the candidate’s research program. The application and three recommendation letters should be submitted at http://apply.interfolio.com/28091

We encourage all candidates to apply by December 19, and applications will be considered until the position is filled. Bard College is an equal opportunity employer and we welcome applications from those who contribute to our diversity. For further information about the position, please contact Prof. Hal Haggard.

How Black Holes Can Turn into White Holes

How Black Holes Can Turn into White Holes


Recent work
by Assistant Professor Hal Haggard and his collaborator Carlo Rovelli on how black holes can explosively transform into white holes is the focus of an article in Nature News.