Physics

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Monday, August 21, 2017

Solar Eclipse Viewing

Safely see the Great American Solar Eclipse through an array of telescopes

In our region the eclipse starts around 1:20 pm and ends around 4:00 pm, with the eclipse maximum occurring around 2:45pm.  Note that it will only be a partial eclipse here, so there is no qualitatively different "minutes of totality" to see (or miss) that people in other parts of the country will be able to witness, just a gradual darkening and lightening.
Time: 1:15 pm – 4:00 pm
Location: Campus Walk (Above Kline)
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Thursday, September 14, 2017

Ancient European Dog Genomes Reveal Continuity Since the Early Neolithic

Krishna VeeramahStony Brook University


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, September 14, 2017

Climate Change and Behavioral Economics: Implications for Policy
 

Howard KunreutherJames D.  Dinan Professor of Decision Sciences and PolicyCo-Director of Wharton Risk Management and Decision Processes CenterWharton School  University of Pennsylvania  

We face challenges in dealing with potentially catastrophic events associated with climate change. Most individuals do not think about investing in energy efficient measures to reduce global warming or undertaking protective actions to reduce damage to their homes from future floods or hurricanes until after a disaster occurs. I will use concepts from behavioral economics and psychology to highlight why we ignore these risks and recommend public-private sector partnerships that provide economic incentives for taking steps now rather than waiting until it is too late.
 
Time: 4:40 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Degradation-resistant Proteins:
Biological, Disease, and Biotechnology Implications

Wilfredo Colón, Ph.D.Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Village of Red Hook Municipal Sewer Project

Brent KovalchikArchitect and Deputy Mayor of Red Hook, NY 

The Village of Red Hook’s Municipal Sewer Project has been developing for over seventy years. Countless planning documents, initiatives, two failed referendums and the path to final completion will be explored.  The project addresses the Village’s economic development future and protection of drinking water supplies for residents and institutions that rely on the Saw Kill Watershed’s aquifer, tributaries and streams for their own needs.
 
Through the example of a municipal infrastructure project, we will discuss the work involved with gathering and documenting the research, finding the necessary funding, advocating for its necessity, and navigating the bureaucratic and regulatory paperwork required to realize this most important project.
 
Time: 4:40 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
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Thursday, October 5, 2017

Effects of Viruses on Plant Fitness:
A Plant Ecologist's Foray into Plant Virus Ecology

Helen AlexanderUniversity of Kansas


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, October 12, 2017

The Evolution of Animal Flight From a Biomechanics Perspective

David E. AlexanderUniversity of Kansas

Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Monday, October 30, 2017

A Reading by Diane Ackerman

The celebrated author reads from The Zookeeper’s Wife

On Monday, October 30, at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, Diane Ackerman reads from The Zookeeper’s Wife. Sponsored by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

The Zookeeper’s Wife, a little known true story of WWII, enjoyed months as the New York Times #1 nonfiction bestseller, was the basis for the 2017 feature film of the same title, and received the Orion Book Award, which honored it as “a groundbreaking work of nonfiction, in which the human relationship to nature is explored in an absolutely original way through looking at the Holocaust. A few years ago, ‘nature’ writers were asking themselves, How can a book be at the same time a work of art, an act of conscientious objection to the destruction of the world, and an affirmation of hope and human decency? The Zookeeper’s Wife answers this question.”

Diane Ackerman’s other works of nonfiction include An Alchemy of Mind, a poetics of the brain based on the latest neuroscience; Deep Play, which considers play, creativity, and our need for transcendence; A Slender Thread, about her work as a crisis line counselor; The Rarest of the Rare and The Moon by Whale Light, in which she explores the plight and fascination of endangered animals; On Extended Wings, her memoir of flying; and her bestseller, A Natural History of the Senses. Her most recent book, The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us, a celebration of the natural world and human ingenuity, and an exploration of human-driven planetary change, received the P.E.N. Henry David Thoreau Award for Nature Writing.

Several of Ackerman's books have been Pulitzer Prize and National Book Circle Critics Award finalists. She also has the rare distinction of having a molecule named after her—dianeackerone— a pheromone in crocodilians. Her essays about nature and human nature have been appearing for decades in the New York Times, New Yorker, American Scholar, Smithsonian, National Geographic, and elsewhere.

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Fall 2017 or future event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with a visiting author, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Micaela Morrissette at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.
Time: 2:30 pm
Location: Campus Center, Weis Cinema
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Thursday, November 2, 2017

Poisons, Predators, and Parasites:
Integrating Ecological and Evolutionary Complexity into Toxicology

Jessica HuaBinghamton University SUNY 


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

AMC 8 Contest

Sponsored by the Bard Math Circle

The AMC 8 is a 25-question, 40-minute, multiple choice examination in middle school mathematics designed to promote the development and enhancement of problem-solving skills.
The contest is paired with an engaging math talk at the middle school level, presented by a Bard mathematician.

The Bard Math Circle hosts this annual event to promote a culture of mathematical problem solving and math enrichment in the mid-Hudson Valley.
Time: 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center
Website: Event Website
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Thursday, November 16, 2017

Integrating Livestock and Wildlife in an African Savanna

Felicia Keesing, Biology Program


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, November 30, 2017

How to Plan a Meaningful Summer

Felicia KeesingBiology Program


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, November 30, 2017

Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003

Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College

In the last four decades of the twentieth century, Harlem, New York—America’s most famous neighborhood—transformed from the archetypal symbol of midcentury “urban crisis” to the most celebrated example of “urban renaissance” in the United States. Once a favored subject for sociologists studying profound poverty and physical decline, by the new millennium Harlem found itself increasingly the site of refurbished brownstones, shiny glass and steel shopping centers, and a growing middle-class population. Drawing from Brian Goldstein’s new book, The Roots of Urban Renaissance: Gentrification and the Struggle Over Harlem (Harvard University Press, 2017), this lecture will trace this arc by focusing on competing visions for Harlem's central block. In doing so, it will reveal the complicated history of social and physical transformation that has changed this and many American urban centers in the last several decades. Gentrification is often described as a process controlled by outsiders, with clear winners and losers, victors and victims. In contrast, this talk will explore the role that Harlemites themselves played in bringing about Harlem’s urban renaissance, an outcome that had both positive and negative effects for their neighborhood. 
Time: 4:40 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
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