Physics

News & Events

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Solving Linear Recurrence Relations Using Generating Functions

Hema GopalakrishnanSacred Heart University

Recurrence relations arise in many fields of study. To solve a recurrence relation is to find an explicit formula for the numbers of the sequence generated by the recurrence. Informally, an ordinary generating function is a power series whose coefficients are the terms of
a given sequence. In this talk, we will introduce the method of generating functions for solving linear recurrence relations with constant coefficients and apply this method to solve the Fibonacci recurrence
relation.
Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Hegeman 204
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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Degradation-resistant Proteins:
Biological, Disease, and Biotechnology Implications

Wilfredo Colón, Ph.D.Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Village of Red Hook Municipal Sewer Project

Brent KovalchikArchitect and Deputy Mayor of Red Hook, NY 

The Village of Red Hook’s Municipal Sewer Project has been developing for over seventy years. Countless planning documents, initiatives, two failed referendums and the path to final completion will be explored.  The project addresses the Village’s economic development future and protection of drinking water supplies for residents and institutions that rely on the Saw Kill Watershed’s aquifer, tributaries and streams for their own needs.
 
Through the example of a municipal infrastructure project, we will discuss the work involved with gathering and documenting the research, finding the necessary funding, advocating for its necessity, and navigating the bureaucratic and regulatory paperwork required to realize this most important project.
 
Time: 4:40 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Psychology Majors Discuss their Summer Work Experience

Over the summer, students in the psychology program engage in learning experiences that take them from Melbourne, Australia to Preston Hall.  In this colloquium, several psychology majors will share details of their summer experiences, provide advice on finding a psychology-related summer job, and describe what they learned about psychology outside of the classroom.  In addition, members of the psychology program faculty will be present to answer questions and provide guidance for applying to jobs for Summer 2018.  For more information, email Tom Hutcheon and thutcheo@bard.edu.
Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Preston Theater
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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Bard Summer Research Institute Poster Session


Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center
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Thursday, October 5, 2017

Effects of Viruses on Plant Fitness:
A Plant Ecologist's Foray into Plant Virus Ecology

Helen AlexanderUniversity of Kansas


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, October 12, 2017

The Evolution of Animal Flight From a Biomechanics Perspective

David E. AlexanderUniversity of Kansas

Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, October 12, 2017

Stress and Memory:
Effects on Multiple Memory Systems

Elizabeth GoldfarbYale School of MedicineYale Stress Center


Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Preston Theater
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Friday, October 13, 2017

Water-Based Liquid Crystals: 
Ordered Fluids with Unusual Properties and Significant Potential for Applications

Peter J. CollingsDepartment of Physics & Astronomy, Swarthmore College 

The liquid crystals used in displays are oily fluids in which the molecules possess orientational order.  Another class of liquid crystals relies on the spontaneous formation of molecular assemblies when certain dyes and drugs are dissolved in water.  These aqueous systems are the subject of significant scientific research, due to the possibility of applications in biology and medicine.  This research reveals that water-based liquid crystals behave quite differently from their oily counterparts, thus creating the understanding necessary to develop new techniques and devices in an area where liquid crystals have had little impact.

 
Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Hegeman 107
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Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Bottleneck in the Drug Pipeline?
Alternative Tumor Measurement-based Phase II Clinical Trial Endpoints for Predicting Overall Survival

Ming-Wen An, Vassar College

In the final stages of a long and costly drug discovery process, a drug compound is introduced into humans as part of a clinical trial. A clinical trial is a research study with a pre-defined protocol and is conducted in different phases. In oncology, as many as 60% of drug compounds that reach the last phase (Phase III) fail this final step. This high failure rate may reflect inappropriate evaluation of compounds in preceding Phase II trials, in which the primary endpoint is often binary tumor response, based on the Response Evaluation Criteria for Solid Tumors (RECIST). This motivates the search for alternative Phase II endpoints. In this talk, we will introduce clinical trials and survival analysis to contextualize the problem. Then we will describe our work evaluating alternative categorical and continuous tumor measurement-based endpoints for their ability to predict overall survival using data from real clinical trials.
Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Hegeman 204
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Thursday, October 26, 2017

A Rose by Any Other Name:
Measuring Activity in the Amygdala in Response to  Odors

Pia-Kelsey O’NeillColumbia University


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, October 26, 2017

Addicted to Rehab:
Race, Gender, and Drug Treatment in the Era of Mass Incarceration 

Allison McKimSociology Program

After decades of the American “war on drugs," relentless prison expansion, and rising opioid deaths, political officials are finally challenging mass incarceration. Many point to an apparently promising solution: addiction treatment. However, we know so little about what goes on inside treatment programs that scholars have called it a “black box.” Allison McKim’s ethnographic research heads inside the black box to compare two treatment programs for women – one in the criminal justice system and one in the healthcare system. There, she finds two different ways of defining and treating addiction. She reveals that the category "addiction" reflects punitive criminal justice policy and its race, class, and gender politics. Thus when we use "addiction" to understand and address complex social problems, we further stigmatize marginalized women, reproduce inequality, and extend punishment.
Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Preston Theater
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Monday, October 30, 2017

A Reading by Diane Ackerman

The celebrated author reads from The Zookeeper’s Wife

On Monday, October 30, at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, Diane Ackerman reads from The Zookeeper’s Wife. Sponsored by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

The Zookeeper’s Wife, a little known true story of WWII, enjoyed months as the New York Times #1 nonfiction bestseller, was the basis for the 2017 feature film of the same title, and received the Orion Book Award, which honored it as “a groundbreaking work of nonfiction, in which the human relationship to nature is explored in an absolutely original way through looking at the Holocaust. A few years ago, ‘nature’ writers were asking themselves, How can a book be at the same time a work of art, an act of conscientious objection to the destruction of the world, and an affirmation of hope and human decency? The Zookeeper’s Wife answers this question.”

Diane Ackerman’s other works of nonfiction include An Alchemy of Mind, a poetics of the brain based on the latest neuroscience; Deep Play, which considers play, creativity, and our need for transcendence; A Slender Thread, about her work as a crisis line counselor; The Rarest of the Rare and The Moon by Whale Light, in which she explores the plight and fascination of endangered animals; On Extended Wings, her memoir of flying; and her bestseller, A Natural History of the Senses. Her most recent book, The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us, a celebration of the natural world and human ingenuity, and an exploration of human-driven planetary change, received the P.E.N. Henry David Thoreau Award for Nature Writing.

Several of Ackerman's books have been Pulitzer Prize and National Book Circle Critics Award finalists. She also has the rare distinction of having a molecule named after her—dianeackerone— a pheromone in crocodilians. Her essays about nature and human nature have been appearing for decades in the New York Times, New Yorker, American Scholar, Smithsonian, National Geographic, and elsewhere.

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Fall 2017 or future event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with a visiting author, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Micaela Morrissette at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.
Time: 2:30 pm
Location: Campus Center, Weis Cinema
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Thursday, November 2, 2017

Poisons, Predators, and Parasites:
Integrating Ecological and Evolutionary Complexity into Toxicology

Jessica HuaBinghamton University SUNY 


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Stellating Deltahedra

 

Heidi Burgiel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Learn to fold a star-building unit -- a modification of the Sonobe module for unit origami.  These modules combine to form right angled pyramids over equilateral triangles.  Participants will have the opportunity to stellate a tetrahedron (creating a cube) and to explore the eight strictly convex deltahedra.

 
Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Hegeman 204
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Thursday, November 9, 2017

The Chimpanzees of Ngogo

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii, Psychology Program


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Digital Topology:
A Smooth Introduction

Nicholas A. ScovilleUrsinus College 

Digital images surround us. They are found in our computers, iPhones, televisions, and more. Because they are so integrated into our lives, there is a constant need to manipulate and investigate these images. Anything that one might want to do with a digital image will inevitably involve some kind of mathematics, whether it be linear algebra, geometry, or topology. In this talk, we will introduce not only the topology of digital images, but topology in general. We'll discuss some of the main ideas in topology and use them to figure out what topology would mean in a digital setting. Our newfound knowledge of digital topology will then allow us to dene a digital version of the Hopf fibration, a function between spheres of different dimensions which links together circles in a beautiful and profound way. This talk will be accessible to undergraduates.
Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Hegeman 204
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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

AMC 8 Contest

Sponsored by the Bard Math Circle

The AMC 8 is a 25-question, 40-minute, multiple choice examination in middle school mathematics designed to promote the development and enhancement of problem-solving skills.
The contest is paired with an engaging math talk at the middle school level, presented by a Bard mathematician.

The Bard Math Circle hosts this annual event to promote a culture of mathematical problem solving and math enrichment in the mid-Hudson Valley.
Time: 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center
Website: Event Website
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Thursday, November 16, 2017

Integrating Livestock and Wildlife in an African Savanna

Felicia Keesing, Biology Program


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, November 30, 2017

How to Plan a Meaningful Summer

Felicia KeesingBiology Program


Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
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Thursday, November 30, 2017

Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003

Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College

In the last four decades of the twentieth century, Harlem, New York—America’s most famous neighborhood—transformed from the archetypal symbol of midcentury “urban crisis” to the most celebrated example of “urban renaissance” in the United States. Once a favored subject for sociologists studying profound poverty and physical decline, by the new millennium Harlem found itself increasingly the site of refurbished brownstones, shiny glass and steel shopping centers, and a growing middle-class population. Drawing from Brian Goldstein’s new book, The Roots of Urban Renaissance: Gentrification and the Struggle Over Harlem (Harvard University Press, 2017), this lecture will trace this arc by focusing on competing visions for Harlem's central block. In doing so, it will reveal the complicated history of social and physical transformation that has changed this and many American urban centers in the last several decades. Gentrification is often described as a process controlled by outsiders, with clear winners and losers, victors and victims. In contrast, this talk will explore the role that Harlemites themselves played in bringing about Harlem’s urban renaissance, an outcome that had both positive and negative effects for their neighborhood. 
Time: 4:40 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
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